Billy Graham

Q:

Billboards are springing up with the slogan “Pray for America.” Politicians talk about having prayer meetings, yet political division seems at an all-time high. Is this really a viable solution for our country?


A:

From the writings of the Rev. Billy Graham

Our nation was founded by people who prayed. When our government was in the process of being formed, Benjamin Franklin addressed the chairman of the Constitutional Convention meeting at Philadelphia in 1787, saying, “I have lived, sir, a long time, and the longer I live the more convincing proofs I see of this truth: that God governs in the affairs of men. And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, it is probable that an empire cannot rise without His aid.”

Millions of people say prayers only in times of danger or uncertainty. Sadly, many pray to gods that have no ears to hear and no eyes to see. But prayers lifted to almighty God can alter history. What a glorious thing it would be if millions of Americans would avail themselves to the greatest form of communication—prayer to the One who hears and knows the anguish of our hearts. We have not yet learned that mankind is more powerful on his knees than behind the most powerful weapons or devices known, when prayers are directed to the Lord God.

The world is being carried on a rushing torrent of history that is sweeping out of control. There is but one power available to redeem the course of events, and that is the power of prayer by God-fearing, Christ-believing people. But we must not pray only for His direction; we must pray for His forgiveness for our willful disobedience. And then we must pray with grateful hearts for the blessings He has bestowed on the United States of America.

(This column is based on the words and writings of the late Rev. Billy Graham.)

Have you received God’s forgiveness? Pray now.

◀DEVOTIONALS/GRACE FOR THE MOMENT – TUESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2018

The Lord God made clothes from animal skins for the man and his wife and dressed them. Genesis 3:21

that simple sentence suggests three powerful scenes. Scene 1: God slays an animal. For the first time in the history of the earth, dirt is stained with blood. Innocent blood. The beast committed no sin. The creature did not deserve to die.

Adam and Eve did. The couple deserves to die, but they live …

Scene 2: Clothing is made. The shaper of the stars now becomes a tailor.

And in Scene 3: God dresses them. “The Lord … dressed them.”

Adam and Eve are on their way out of the garden. They’ve been told to leave, but now God tells them to stop. “Those fig leaves,” he says, shaking his head, “will never do.” And he produces some clothing. But he doesn’t throw the garments at their feet and tell them to get dressed. He dresses them himself. As a father would zip up the jacket of a preschooler. God covers them.

from A Love Worth Giving

Night Light For Couples

Differing Assumptions

“May the God who gives endurance and encouragement give you a spirit of unity among yourselves as you follow Christ Jesus.” Romans 15:5

As in last night’s story, “The Argument,” a difficult day can quickly lead to an unnecessarily heated exchange between spouses. Fatigue, problems with the kids or job, illness, or financial worries can make anyone more susceptible to a fight. So can the condition I (jcd) call “differing assumptions.” For example, after a particularly grueling series of speaking appear‐

ances some years ago, I came dragging home on Friday night feeling I’d earned a day off. I planned to watch a USC‐Alabama football game on TV the next day. That seemed like a reasonable plan for a guy who had been out earning a living day and night. Shirley, on the other hand, had been running our home and watching the kids for six weeks and felt it was time I pitched in on a few chores. It was entirely reasonable for Shirley to think that she deserved some help at home after doing “domestic duty” for six weeks. Our assumptions collided about ten o’clock Saturday morning. Harsh words froze our relationship for three days. It was a stupid fight, but understandable in light of factors like overwork, fatigue, selfishness, and very different views of what the other was thinking.

When we’re making our own plans we need to remember to consider our partner’s mental and physical state. During stressful circumstances, we should take extra care to communicate our expectations ahead of time.

Just between us…

  • Have differing assumptions caused us to argue recently?
  • How can I do a better job of being aware of your mood?
  • Do we communicate our expectations ahead of time?

Lord, by Your Spirit, help us to be aware of each other’s needs and to take care in our communication. Draw us together in unity and in love of You. Amen.

  • From Night Light For Couples, by Dr. James & Shirley Dobson
    Copyright © 2000 by James Dobson, Inc. All rights reserved.

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